2015 AAUP In the News

11.13.2015 | Settling with Salaita

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign announced a $875,000 settlement on Thursday in its dispute with Steven Salaita, who was "unhired" in 2014 due to his controversial anti-Israel tweets. Noting that it was premature to say how the settlement would affect UIUC's current status as a censured institution, Henry Reichman, chair of the AAUP's Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure, said the association is "willing and able to continue working with the university to see it get off the censure list."

11.10.2015 | University of Illinois Nears Settlement with Controversial Professor

The University of Illinois has reached a tentative settlement with Steven Salaita, whose offer of a tenured position at the Urbana-Champaign campus was rescinded in August 2014 due to Salaita's anti-Israel comments on Twitter. The university's trustees will vote on the settlement Thursday. The AAUP censured the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign following a report concluding that its actions "cast a pall of uncertainty over the degree to which academic freedom is understood and respected."

11.02.2015 | Defending Affirmative Action

The American Council on Education, representing the AAUP and 36 other groups, submitted an amicus brief in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, a US Supreme Court case addressing the validity of race as a factor in student admissions. The brief argues that “For courts to override educators’ reasoned judgment on how and what kinds of diversity yield educational benefit would truncate American colleges’ and universities’ historic right to assemble students in a way that fits the institutions’ educational philosophies and contexts.”

11.02.2015 | The Case for Better Faculty Pay

A recent study demonstrates that higher spending on instruction yields positive outcomes—including better employment results—for undergraduates, especially disadvantaged students. AAUP senior higher education researcher John Barnshaw said, “There’s a sea change in higher education with the widespread use of part-time faculty, and this is more evidence controlling for several important factors of the impact of instructional expenditures.”

10.29.2015 | Liberal Arts Minus Liberal Arts Professors

Drastic cuts in faculty and programs at Iowa's Wartburg College and other small liberal arts colleges raise concerns not only about the integrity of liberal arts education, but also about tenure and governance. In such cases, AAUP Associate Secretary Greg Scholtz said, “what we’re concerned about, of course, is whether the institution unilaterally starts firing tenured faculty just to save costs, without any faculty involvement.”

10.28.2015 | Grove City Apologizes to Professor It Fired in 1962

A former president of Grove City College has apologized to the professor whose firing in 1962 resulted in the college's AAUP censure. Grove City College has been on the AAUP censure list longer than any other institution. 93-year-old professor Larry Gara, who continued his teaching career at another college, said, "I never thought they would come around."

10.22.2015 | Accidental Activists

In an interview about his new book, University Reform: The Founding of the American Association of University Professors, Hans-Joerg Tiede discusses how the AAUP has evolved since its founding in 2015. Looking ahead to the next century, he said, "the AAUP should continue to do what it has done over the last 100 years: it should stress the core principles of academic freedom, tenure and governance, and respond to the changes in higher education, including the changing composition of the professoriate."

10.20.2015 | Akron University President Gives ‘State of the University’ as Professors Protest

Local AAUP chapter members demonstrated outside of a speech by Akron University President Scott Scarborough, who defended his decision to take extreme measures to address the school's financial challenges. AAUP chapter president John Zipp said "Between four and seven percent of the faculty agree with the direction the university is going with shared governance and . . . we are trying to drive home that point."