Stopping the Tenure Clock

Tenure remains a fundamental requirement for protecting academic freedom as stated in the 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure. Younger faculty members may be forced to make hard decisions between family and career during the probationary period such as whether to delay attempts at childbearing or the provision of care for a family member with special needs. Upon request, a faculty member should be allowed to stop the tenure clock or extend the probationary period, with or without taking a full or partial leave of absence. The potential for stopping the tenure clock is a component of the 2001 Statement of Principles on Family Responsibilities and Academic Work. See also, Effective Policies and Programs for Retention and Advancement of Women, the Work Life Law Center, University of California Hastings College of Law.

See examples of institutional policies below:

University of Wisconsin at Madison.pdf

Tenure clock may be stopped up to one year to provide elder or dependent care.

University of Michigan.pdf

Tenure clock may be stopped up to one year to provide elder or dependent care.

Duke University.pdf

Tenure clock may be stopped up to one semester with pay for a faculty member with a serious health condition; up to one year for a faculty member with responsibilities for elder or dependent care.

Claremont McKenna.pdf

Tenure clock may be stopped up to one year.

(posted 1/04)