Access to Higher Education

The Myths of Meritocracy

As the daughter of affluent professionals, I always thought merit-based aid filled a gap in the funding of higher education for students like me, who excelled in school by traditional measures but did not qualify for need-based aid, even after going through the grueling process of filling out applications for student financial aid offered by the government and the College Board.

From the Editor: No Entrance

Three years ago, I became the editor of Academe. This is my last issue. Editing the magazine has been enormously rewarding.

Though I’m a pessimist, I often remain cheerful. Even when I think the glass is two-thirds empty, I can find ways to enjoy whatever juice is left in the bottom. Still, I’m shocked by how much worse off higher education is now than it was when I became editor. By almost every measure. Of all of the things that dismay and exercise me, of the multitude of scandals and crises in higher education, one subsumes them all.

New Ways to Fund Higher Ed?

The Campaign for the Future of Higher Education has released three working papers with ideas on ways to fund higher education. One, by AAUP president Rudy Fichtenbaum, explains how to achieve vastly improved funding for higher education through a miniscule tax on selected financial transactions. Learn how to add your voice to the conversation.

Subscribe to Access to Higher Education